AIDS Articles A-Z

AIDS - Drug Interactions With Liposomal Doxorubicin

This page contains links to eMedTV AIDS Articles containing information on subjects from AIDS to Drug Interactions With Liposomal Doxorubicin. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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  • AIDS
    This eMedTV resource explains how AIDS is the most advanced stage of an HIV infection, when microbes that don't normally infect healthy people can be life-threatening. Information on its prevalence, especially among minorities, is also provided.
  • AIDS and the Brain
    There are a number of problems associated with AIDS and the brain and nervous system. This eMedTV page discusses AIDS and the brain, including complications such as brain damage, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, and cerebral toxoplasmosis.
  • AIDS Information
    As this eMedTV article explains, in people with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the immune system becomes unable to fight infections. This Web page provides basic information on AIDS, with statistics on how prevalent this epidemic has become.
  • AIDS Statistics
    The total estimated number of AIDS diagnoses through 2003 in the United States is 929,985. This eMedTV segment provides AIDS statistics on death rates and the estimated number of cases by age and ethnicity, as well as exposure category.
  • AIDS Symptoms
    This eMedTV Web page describes AIDS symptoms that are usually from opportunistic infections, and can include diarrhea, fever, weight loss, difficulty swallowing, and others. Signs and symptoms of AIDS tend to appear gradually, but can be sudden.
  • Aptivus
    Aptivus is a medicine that is often prescribed with ritonavir for the treatment of HIV and AIDS. This eMedTV resource describes how the drug works, explains what you should know before taking it, and lists common side effects that may occur.
  • Aptivus and Breastfeeding
    Women with HIV or AIDS (including those taking Aptivus) are typically advised to avoid breastfeeding. This eMedTV page offers more information about Aptivus and breastfeeding, and explains why it may be dangerous for women with HIV.
  • Aptivus and Pregnancy
    According to certain animal studies, Aptivus may not be safe for use during pregnancy. This eMedTV article contains more information on Aptivus and pregnancy, and describes the problems that occurred when the drug was given to pregnant rabbits.
  • Aptivus Dosage
    The recommended Aptivus dosage for adults is 500 mg twice a day, combined with 200 mg of ritonavir. This eMedTV segment offers more detailed Aptivus dosing guidelines and includes a list of tips and precautions for those taking the HIV medication.
  • Aptivus Drug Information
    Are you looking for information on the drug Aptivus? This eMedTV article provides a brief overview of this HIV/AIDS medication, including how it works, why it is given as part of a drug "cocktail," and what to discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Aptivus Drug Interactions
    Medications that can cause negative interactions with Aptivus include statins, abacavir, and pimozide. This eMedTV Web page includes a more complete list of medicines that can cause Aptivus drug interactions and describes the possible effects.
  • Aptivus Overdose
    An Aptivus overdose will most likely cause the regular side effects, but perhaps more severely. This eMedTV article further discusses the possible effects of an Aptivus overdose and explains the treatment options that are available.
  • Aptivus Side Effects
    Fever, nausea, and diarrhea appear to be the most common side effects of Aptivus. This segment from the eMedTV library lists other common Aptivus side effects, as well as less common but potentially serious problems that require medical attention.
  • Aptivus Uses
    Aptivus uses are primarily concerned with treating HIV infection and AIDS. This article from the eMedTV Web site explains how the medication works, describes its effects, and discusses possible off-label uses for Aptivus.
  • Aptivus Warnings and Precautions
    There have been reports of bleeding in the brain in people taking Aptivus. This eMedTV segment offers other important Aptivus warnings and precautions, and also includes information on who should not take the HIV medication.
  • Atripla
    Atripla is a prescription HIV and AIDS medication. This eMedTV article describes the various components that are in the combination drug, explains how Atripla works to stop HIV from multiplying, and offers dosing information for the medicine.
  • Atripla and Breastfeeding
    Most women who are taking Atripla should avoid breastfeeding. This eMedTV resource provides a more in-depth look at Atripla and breastfeeding, including important information on why it is generally unsafe for women with HIV or AIDS to breastfeed.
  • Atripla and Depression
    Depression is a side effect that has been reported in people taking Atripla. This page on the eMedTV Web site further discusses the link between Atripla and depression, and explains why researchers do not know for sure if the drug causes depression.
  • Atripla and Pregnancy
    Based on information from animal studies, taking Atripla during pregnancy may be unsafe. This eMedTV Web page contains more information about Atripla and pregnancy, and describes the potential risks of using the drug while pregnant.
  • Atripla Dosage
    When treating HIV and AIDS, the recommended Atripla dosage is one tablet once daily. This segment of the eMedTV Web site provides other important Atripla dosing information, including suggestions on when and how to take the medicine.
  • Atripla Drug Interactions
    Sertraline, ribavirin, and methadone are some of the medicines that may cause Atripla drug interactions. This eMedTV segment lists other drugs that may interact with Atripla and describes the potentially negative effects that can occur as a result.
  • Atripla Medication Information
    This eMedTV page provides information on Atripla, a prescription drug used to treat HIV and AIDS. Topics discussed in this overview include how it works, what to discuss with your healthcare provider, and more. A link to more details is also included.
  • Atripla Overdose
    Headaches, dizziness, and drowsiness are possible symptoms of an Atripla overdose. This eMedTV article describes other potential effects of an overdose and explains the treatment options that are available if too much of the medication is taken.
  • Atripla Side Effects
    Common side effects of Atripla may include sinus infection, headaches, and fatigue. This part of the eMedTV library describes other possible side effects of the drug and lists potentially serious problems that may require immediate medical attention.
  • Atripla Uses
    Atripla is used for treating HIV. This page from the eMedTV archives discusses Atripla uses in more detail, including information on how the drug works and whether it can be used to treat HIV or AIDS in children and adolescents.
  • Atripla Warnings and Precautions
    Atripla can cause dizziness, drowsiness, and problems with concentration. This eMedTV segment lists other side effects or complications that may occur with Atripla. Warnings and precautions on who should not take the drug are also included.
  • Benefits of Selenium
    There are several selenium benefits, such as treating or preventing conditions like cancer or AIDS. This eMedTV resource further explains how selenium is supposedly beneficial for other health conditions and discusses its use in children.
  • Combivir
    Combivir, a prescription medication, helps prevent the HIV virus from spreading to uninfected cells. This eMedTV resource describes the drug in detail, explaining how it works, when and how it should be taken, side effects, and more.
  • Combivir and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV segment discusses the issues surrounding Combivir and breastfeeding. It explains why women are often advised to feed their babies formula instead, but also stresses the importance of discussing the issue with your healthcare provider.
  • Combivir and Depression
    This eMedTV Web page takes a look at Combivir and depression. It presents statistics on the side effect, explains why it's hard to know with certainty if there is a link between the two, and stresses talking with your doctor if symptoms occur.
  • Combivir and Insomnia
    This page of the eMedTV archives presents a discussion on Combivir and insomnia. It explains how common the side effect is, why it's hard to know for sure if there's a connection between the two, and what to do if insomnia symptoms occur.
  • Combivir and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV Web page presents a discussion on Combivir and pregnancy. It explains the results of animal and human studies on the individual components of the drug and describes the circumstances under which Combivir may be given to a pregnant woman.
  • Combivir Dosage
    As this eMedTV segment explains, everyone takes the same Combivir dosage, although it may not be given to certain people. This segment explains what that dose is, why this is the case, and offers guidelines and tips for those taking the drug.
  • Combivir Drug Interactions
    Combivir drug interactions can occur if it is combined with valproic acid and ritonavir, among other things. This eMedTV article lists other drugs that can cause interactions, explains the negative results, and describes how they may be avoided.
  • Combivir Overdose
    When a Combivir overdose occurs, nausea and vomiting can be expected. This eMedTV resource describes potentially dangerous symptoms that may also occur, explains factors that can affect symptoms, and describes possible treatment options.
  • Combivir Side Effects
    Problems don't often occur with Combivir; side effects, however, are possible, so this eMedTV page provides a list of the most common ones. Information is also provided on rare but potentially serious side effects that may require medical attention.
  • Combivir Uses
    Combivir uses are concerned with treating and preventing HIV infection and AIDS. This segment of the eMedTV library explains these uses in detail, also discussing off-label uses for the combination drug and explaining its use in children.
  • Combivir Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV resource provides several Combivir warnings and precautions that people should be aware of before taking the drug. This includes possible side effects, conditions to tell your doctor about, and people who should avoid the medication.
  • Complera
    Complera is a medicine prescribed for the treatment of HIV and AIDS. This page of the eMedTV Web site offers an in-depth overview of this combination medication, including details on potential side effects, dosing tips, and general safety precautions.
  • Complera and Breastfeeding
    It may not be safe for women to take Complera (emtricitabine/rilpivirine/tenofovir) while breastfeeding. This eMedTV resource describes the potential risks and explains why it is recommended that women with HIV or AIDS avoid breastfeeding if possible.
  • Complera and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV page explains, the FDA has classified Complera (emtricitabine/rilpivirine/tenofovir) as a pregnancy Category B drug, meaning it is probably safe for use in pregnant women. This page further explores animal studies done on this topic.
  • Complera Dosage
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, dosing guidelines for Complera call for taking one tablet once a day with a full meal. This article takes a closer look at how to use this medication, including important steps for using it safely and effectively.
  • Complera Drug Interactions
    As explained in this eMedTV Web page, drug interactions may occur if Complera is combined with certain seizure medicines, antibiotics, or antifungals. This page lists other products that may cause problems and describes the complications that may occur.
  • Complera Medication Information
    Adults with HIV or AIDS may benefit from Complera. This article from the eMedTV Web archives takes a closer look at how this prescription drug works to prevent HIV from multiplying, offers some general dosing information, and lists possible side effects.
  • Complera Overdose
    As this eMedTV segment explains, an overdose on Complera (emtricitabine/rilpivirine/tenofovir) can cause potentially serious problems, such as kidney problems and persistent vomiting. This article describes other symptoms and available treatment options.
  • Complera Side Effects
    Clinical trials have shown that common Complera side effects include insomnia and headaches. This eMedTV Web page describes other possible reactions to this HIV medicine, including potentially serious problems that should be reported to your doctor.
  • Complera Uses
    If you have HIV or AIDS, your doctor may prescribe Complera. This article from the eMedTV Web library provides an in-depth look at what Complera is used for and how it works to prevent the HIV virus from multiplying and infecting healthy cells.
  • Complera Warnings and Precautions
    Some people who have certain medical issues or who are using certain drugs may not be able to take Complera. This eMedTV article outlines important precautions and safety warnings for Complera, including potentially serious complications that may occur.
  • Crixivan
    Crixivan is a medication that is commonly prescribed for treating HIV and AIDS. This article on the eMedTV site explains what you should know before taking this drug, describes how it works, and lists possible side effects that may occur.
  • Crixivan and Breastfeeding
    Most women taking Crixivan should avoid breastfeeding. This segment from the eMedTV library provides more information about Crixivan and breastfeeding, and explains why it is recommended that women with HIV or AIDS avoid breastfeeding in general.
  • Crixivan and Pregnancy
    Crixivan may not be safe for use during pregnancy. As this eMedTV resource explains, clinical studies on Crixivan and pregnancy show that the drug increased the risk of jaundice and extra rib growth (in newborns) when it was given to pregnant animals.
  • Crixivan Dosage
    For the treatment of HIV or AIDS, the recommended Crixivan dosage is 800 mg every eight hours. This eMedTV Web page explains why Crixivan dosing may be lower for some people and offers a list of tips on how and when to take the medication.
  • Crixivan Drug Information
    Are you looking for information on Crixivan? This eMedTV page contains some basic information on this HIV/AIDS drug, including what to discuss with your healthcare provider before starting treatment. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Crixivan Drug Interactions
    Medicines that may cause negative Crixivan drug interactions include imozide, efavirenz, and nevirapine. This eMedTV page contains a more detailed list of drugs that may interact with Crixivan and describes the possible effects of mixing these drugs.
  • Crixivan Overdose
    Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea are possible symptoms of a Crixivan overdose. This article from the eMedTV Web site lists other symptoms that have been reported with a Crixivan overdose and describes the treatment options that are available.
  • Crixivan Side Effects
    Common Crixivan side effects may include back pain, nausea, and vomiting. Besides common side effects, this eMedTV resource also lists rare but potentially serious problems that require medical attention, such as kidney stones and high blood sugar.
  • Crixivan Uses
    Crixivan is used for treating HIV and AIDS in adults only. This article from the eMedTV archives discusses possible off-label Crixivan uses and offers a more in-depth look at how the medication works to prevent HIV from multiplying.
  • Crixivan Warnings and Precautions
    It is not known whether Crixivan can safely be taken by people with kidney disease. This eMedTV page includes other Crixivan warnings and precautions regarding the safety of the medication and lists possible side effects that may occur with the drug.
  • Does Selenium Work?
    This eMedTV page explains that although more research is necessary, selenium appears to help treat or prevent some health problems (such as HIV, AIDS, and certain types of cancer). This page takes a closer look at the question, "Does selenium work?"
  • Dronabinol
    People who experience nausea and vomiting related to chemotherapy may benefit from dronabinol. This eMedTV resource provides a detailed overview of this prescription drug, with information on side effects, dosing, and what to do in cases of overdose.
  • Dronabinol Dosage
    When used to treat AIDS-related lack of appetite, the usual dronabinol dosage is 2.5 mg to start. This eMedTV resource describes how this amount may be adjusted, how dosing is calculated when treating nausea and vomiting, and general treatment tips.
  • Dronabinol Drug Information
    Dronabinol is a medication used to treat nausea, vomiting, and appetite loss due to certain conditions. This eMedTV article offers some basic information on the drug, with details on how to take dronabinol, safety warnings, and more.
  • Drug Interactions With Dronabinol
    Barbiturates, anticholinergics, and ADHD drugs are among the products that can interact with dronabinol. This eMedTV selection provides a detailed list of medications that can react with dronabinol and describes the problems that can occur as a result.
  • Drug Interactions With Epoetin Alfa
    At this time, it is not known whether other medicines will interact negatively with epoetin alfa. As this eMedTV page explains, however, it is important to know that no studies have been conducted to check for drug interactions with epoetin alfa.
  • Drug Interactions With Lamivudine
    Ribavirin, interferon medications, and zalcitabine may cause drug interactions with lamivudine. This eMedTV Web page describes the possible effects of these negative interactions and lists other medicines that may interact with lamivudine.
  • Drug Interactions With Liposomal Doxorubicin
    Herceptin, Zanosar, and Taxol are just a few of the drugs that can interact with liposomal doxorubicin. This eMedTV Web resource offers a detailed list of potential interactions, with a discussion of the negative effects that can occur as a result.
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