AIDS Articles A-Z

HIV Tests - Kaletra Side Effects

This page contains links to eMedTV AIDS Articles containing information on subjects from HIV Tests to Kaletra Side Effects. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • HIV Tests
    This eMedTV article examines various HIV tests, such as blood tests, urine tests, and oral tests. People are encouraged to see a doctor for testing, because most home-based tests are not FDA-approved, so they are not considered accurate.
  • HIV Transmission
    As this eMedTV selection explains, HIV transmission typically occurs through sharing needles or having unprotected sex with an infected person. This page covers the ways HIV can be spread, as well as the ways in which it can't.
  • Hivid
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Hivid as part of a treatment plan for HIV or AIDS. This eMedTV article provides an overview of Hivid, explaining how the drug works, possible side effects, and tips for when and how to take the medication.
  • Hivid and Breastfeeding
    It is not known if Hivid passes through breast milk. This portion of the eMedTV library explains that there has been no research done on Hivid and breastfeeding, and discusses why it is generally recommended that women with HIV avoid breastfeeding.
  • Hivid and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV page explains why it is not known if it is safe to take Hivid during pregnancy. This page also discusses the results of animal studies involving Hivid and pregnancy, and explains why Hivid is classified as a pregnancy Category C medicine.
  • Hivid Dosage
    This eMedTV Web page explains that the recommended Hivid dosage when treating HIV or AIDS is 0.75 mg three times a day (every eight hours). This page also covers general Hivid dosing guidelines and offers some tips for taking the medication.
  • Hivid Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV resource explores potential Hivid drug interactions with other drugs, such as certain antibiotics and some antacids. This page also covers how these interactions can increase your risk of side effects or cause Hivid to be less effective.
  • Hivid for HIV/AIDS
    As explained in this selection from the eMedTV archives, Hivid is a drug that was formerly used to treat HIV and AIDS. This article gives a brief description of how the drug works and includes a link to more in-depth information.
  • Hivid Overdose
    This part of the eMedTV Web site describes possible symptoms of a Hivid overdose, such as vomiting, fever, and unusual sensations (such as burning or numbness). This page also covers possible treatment options and factors that affect overdose effects.
  • Hivid Side Effects
    Some of the most commonly reported Hivid side effects include nausea, fatigue, and diarrhea. This eMedTV Web page also takes an in-depth look at some of the more serious side effects, such as seizures, unusual bleeding or bruising, and depression.
  • Hivid Uses
    Hivid is used for the treatment of HIV and AIDS in adults and adolescents. This eMedTV page explains how Hivid uses also extend to preventing HIV infection in people exposed to the virus (such as accidents involving a contaminated needle).
  • Hivid Warnings and Precautions
    Hivid appears to increase the risk of lymphoma (a certain cancer) and congestive heart failure. This part of the eMedTV archives takes an in-depth look at several Hivid warnings and precautions, including who should not take the medication.
  • How Megace Works
    Megace is a medication used in the treatment of AIDS and certain types of cancers. This eMedTV Web selection offers details on how Megace works and describes some of the beneficial effects of this medicine. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Intelence
    Intelence is a prescription medication commonly used as part of an HIV "cocktail" to treat HIV and AIDS. This eMedTV article describes how the drug works, offers dosing guidelines, and explains what side effects may occur with treatment.
  • Intelence and Breastfeeding
    Most women taking Intelence (etravirine) should not breastfeed. This eMedTV segment talks about Intelence and breastfeeding, and also explains why women with HIV or AIDS in developed countries are advised to avoid breastfeeding in general.
  • Intelence and Pregnancy
    Based on information from animal studies, Intelence (etravirine) is probably safe for use during pregnancy. This eMedTV article provides more information on Intelence and pregnancy, and explores the results of these animal studies.
  • Intelence Dosage
    The recommended Intelence dosage for treating HIV or AIDS is 200 mg twice a day after meals. This eMedTV segment offers more detailed dosing guidelines and also includes tips and precautions for using this HIV medication.
  • Intelence Drug Interactions
    Medicines that may cause Intelence drug interactions include warfarin, diazepam, and dexamethasone. This eMedTV resource lists other medications that may interfere with Intelence and describes the potential dangers of these interactions.
  • Intelence Medication Information
    Intelence is a medicine used for HIV and AIDS. However, as this eMedTV article explains, its use is reserved for cases in which a person has become resistant to other HIV medications. This article offers some basic drug information on Intelence.
  • Intelence Overdose
    It is not clear what to expect from an Intelence (etravirine) overdose. As this eMedTV page explains, the effects of an Intelence overdose will vary depending on several factors, including the dosage. Treatment options are also listed in this article.
  • Intelence Side Effects
    Common Intelence side effects include tingling, burning, or pain in the hands or feet. This eMedTV resource provides a more complete list of possible side effects, including common problems as well as serious side effects that require medical attention.
  • Intelence Uses
    Intelence is used for treating HIV and AIDS. This article from the eMedTV library explains how this HIV drug works, describes its effects, and discusses possible off-label Intelence uses.
  • Intelence Warnings and Precautions
    Intelence can change the distribution of fat on your body. This eMedTV resource contains a list of other side effects or problems that may occur with Intelence. Warnings and precautions on who should not use this drug are also listed on this page.
  • Intellence
    Intelence is a medication often prescribed as part of an HIV "cocktail" for the treatment of HIV or AIDS. This eMedTV segment explains how Intelence works and describes the effects of the medicine. Intellence is a common misspelling of Intelence.
  • Invirase
    Invirase is typically prescribed to treat HIV or AIDS. This selection from the eMedTV Web site provides an overview of this medication, including information on how it works, possible side effects, and tips for when and how to take it.
  • Invirase and Breastfeeding
    Women who are taking Invirase are typically advised to avoid breastfeeding. This page from the eMedTV Web site discusses Invirase and breastfeeding in more detail, and explains why it may be dangerous for women who have HIV to breastfeed.
  • Invirase and Pregnancy
    In general, it is probably safe to take Invirase during pregnancy. However, as this eMedTV article explains, no animal studies involving Invirase and pregnancy have been done with the combination of ritonavir (which is always taken with Invirase).
  • Invirase Dosage
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, the recommended Invirase dosage for treating HIV or AIDS in adults is 1000 mg twice daily (along with 100 mg of ritonavir twice daily). This page also provides some tips for when and how to take the medication.
  • Invirase Drug Information
    This part of the eMedTV site offers some basic information on Invirase, a drug used to treat HIV and AIDS. Topics covered in this article include when and how it is taken, what to discuss with your healthcare provider, and more.
  • Invirase Drug Interactions
    Some of the drugs that may interact with Invirase include birth control pills, digoxin, and warfarin. This eMedTV resource outlines other medicines that may cause Invirase drug interactions and describes the problems these interactions can cause.
  • Invirase Overdose
    If you take too much Invirase, you should contact your doctor right away. This eMedTV page explains that if you experience an Invirase overdose, a doctor may have to pump your stomach or treat the symptoms that occur as a result of the overdose.
  • Invirase Side Effects
    Nausea, diarrhea, and fatigue are among the most common Invirase side effects. This portion of the eMedTV archives outlines other possible side effects of Invirase and describes which ones should be reported to your healthcare provider.
  • Invirase Uses
    Invirase is approved for use in combination with other medicines to treat HIV and AIDS in adults. This eMedTV page further discusses Invirase uses, including off-label uses and whether it is used in children. This page also covers how Invirase works.
  • Invirase Warnings and Precautions
    Invirase may cause high blood sugar and can make liver problems worse. This segment of the eMedTV library highlights other important information on Invirase warnings and precautions, including a list of those who should not take the medication.
  • Is Selenium Safe?
    If you have certain health problems, you should talk to your doctor before using selenium supplements. This eMedTV page further explains what you should know before taking selenium. Safety precautions on who should not use it are also included.
  • Isentress
    Isentress is a prescription drug that is used in combination with other HIV medicines to treat HIV and AIDS. This eMedTV article describes how Isentress works, offers general dosing guidelines, and provides some general precautions for the drug.
  • Isentress and Breastfeeding
    Women are generally advised to avoid Isentress while breastfeeding. This eMedTV Web page contains more information about Isentress and breastfeeding, and explains why it may be dangerous to nurse an infant if you have HIV or AIDS.
  • Isentress and Pregnancy
    Isentress may not be safe for use during pregnancy. This article from the eMedTV library provides more information on Isentress and pregnancy, and describes why the FDA has classified Isentress as a pregnancy Category C medication.
  • Isentress Dosage
    As this eMedTV segment explains, for treating HIV or AIDS in adults who are not taking rifampin, the recommended Isentress dosage is one 400-mg tablet twice a day. This article contains other important dosing guidelines for this medication.
  • Isentress Drug Interactions
    As this eMedTV page explains, interactions can occur if Isentress is taken with rifampin, tipranavir, or other drugs. This article lists the medicines that can interfere with Isentress and explains how to avoid these interactions.
  • Isentress for HIV/AIDS
    If you have been diagnosed with HIV or AIDS, your healthcare provider may prescribe a drug called Isentress. This eMedTV article gives a brief overview of this prescription medication and includes a link to more details.
  • Isentress Overdose
    You should seek immediate medical attention if you believe you have taken too much Isentress. This part of the eMedTV Web site describes what to expect if you experience an Isentress overdose and discusses possible treatment options.
  • Isentress Side Effects
    Some of the most common Isentress side effects include diarrhea, headaches, and nausea. This part of the eMedTV archives lists other common side effects of the drug and describes potentially serious side effects that may require prompt medical care.
  • Isentress Uses
    Isentress is used for treating HIV infection and AIDS. This selection from the eMedTV Web site describes how the drug works to prevent the HIV virus from multiplying and explains whether the drug is used in children.
  • Isentress Warnings and Precautions
    Missing Isentress doses may cause the HIV virus to become resistant to the drug. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at other Isentress warnings and precautions, and explains what you should tell your doctor about before starting treatment.
  • Isentris
    This eMedTV page explains that Isentress is a prescription drug that may help prevent the HIV virus from multiplying in people who have HIV or AIDS. This page also covers some dosing tips. Isentris is a common misspelling of Isentress.
  • Isentriss
    Isentress is typically prescribed along with other HIV drugs to treat HIV infection and AIDS. This eMedTV article also describes possible side effects (such as headaches, nausea, and fever). Isentriss is a common misspelling of Isentress.
  • Kaletra
    Kaletra is commonly prescribed along with other HIV medications for the treatment of HIV or AIDS. This eMedTV article describes how this medication works, explains when and how to take it, and lists possible side effects that may occur with treatment.
  • Kaletra and Breastfeeding
    Women are generally advised to avoid breastfeeding while taking Kaletra. This segment from the eMedTV archives provides a more in-depth look at Kaletra and breastfeeding, including information on why it is unsafe for women with HIV to breastfeed.
  • Kaletra and Pregnancy
    According to animal studies, Kaletra may not be safe for use during pregnancy. This article on the eMedTV Web site discusses Kaletra and pregnancy in more detail and explains what problems occurred when the drug was given to pregnant rats.
  • Kaletra Dosage
    As this eMedTV segment explains, your healthcare provider may recommend a once-daily or twice-daily dosing regimen for Kaletra. This article looks at the dosing guidelines for this drug, including the factors that will affect when and how you take it.
  • Kaletra Drug Interactions
    A number of medicines may cause Kaletra drug interactions, including pimozide, tenofovir, and statins. This eMedTV resource lists other drugs that may interact with Kaletra and describes the potentially negative effects of these interactions.
  • Kaletra Medication Information
    Kaletra is prescribed to treat HIV and AIDS. This eMedTV Web page offers some helpful information about this medication, including details on Kaletra's side effects and what to discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Kaletra Overdose
    An overdose of liquid Kaletra may cause symptoms of alcohol poisoning (since the drug contains alcohol). This eMedTV article further describes the effects of a Kaletra overdose and lists the treatment options that are available.
  • Kaletra Side Effects
    Potential side effects of Kaletra include vomiting, weakness, and gas. This eMedTV resource lists the most commonly reported side effects and also explains which potentially serious adverse reactions may require immediate medical attention.
Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2017 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.