AIDS Articles A-Z

Fuzeon - HIV Info

This page contains links to eMedTV AIDS Articles containing information on subjects from Fuzeon to HIV Info. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Fuzeon
    Fuzeon is prescribed in combination with other drugs to treat HIV and AIDS. This eMedTV article provides detailed information on the medication, including potential side effects, dosing information, and important tips and precautions.
  • Fuzeon and Breastfeeding
    Taking Fuzeon and breastfeeding is typically not a safe combination. This selection from the eMedTV Web site explains why women who have HIV or AIDS should generally not breastfeed in order to prevent transmitting the HIV virus to their infant.
  • Fuzeon and Pregnancy
    It is generally considered safe to take Fuzeon during pregnancy. This article from the eMedTV Web site explains the results of animal studies involving Fuzeon and pregnancy, and describes why the FDA classifies Fuzeon as a pregnancy Category B drug.
  • Fuzeon Dosage
    This eMedTV page explains that the recommended Fuzeon dosage when treating HIV or AIDS will depend on several factors, such as age and weight. This page also lists Fuzeon dosing guidelines for adults and children, and offers tips for taking the drug.
  • Fuzeon Drug Interactions
    At this time, there are no known Fuzeon drug interactions. However, as this eMedTV resource explains, this does not mean that there is no possibility that Fuzeon may interact with other medicines, as it has not been tested with every single drug.
  • Fuzeon Medication for HIV
    A prescription HIV/AIDS medication, Fuzeon is only approved for use in combination with other HIV drugs. This eMedTV resource gives a brief overview of how Fuzeon works and how it is taken. A link to more details is also included.
  • Fuzeon Overdose
    This portion of the eMedTV archives describes what to expect if you take too much Fuzeon. This resource also covers the factors that may affect a Fuzeon overdose and describes possible treatment options (such as supportive care).
  • Fuzeon Side Effects
    Some of the most commonly reported Fuzeon side effects include reactions at the injection site. This eMedTV Web page outlines other possible side effects of the drug, including more serious side effects that may require prompt medical attention.
  • Fuzeon Uses
    Fuzeon is used for the treatment of HIV infection and AIDS. This portion of the eMedTV archives explains how the medication works to prevent the HIV virus from entering the cells and multiplying. This page also discusses Fuzeon uses in children.
  • Fuzeon Warnings and Precautions
    This portion of the eMedTV archives takes an in-depth look at several Fuzeon warnings and precautions, such as the possibility of the medication causing pneumonia or allergic reactions. This article also describes who should not take the drug.
  • Generic Agenerase
    As this eMedTV segment explains, there are no generic versions of Agenerase available in the United States. This page has more information on this topic and warns people against so-called generic Agenerase products.
  • Generic Aptivus
    Aptivus is not available in generic form at this time. As this eMedTV resource explains, while the drug is currently under the protection of a patent, companies can begin making generic Aptivus products as soon as this patent expires in 2014.
  • Generic Atripla
    Currently, no generic Atripla products are licensed for sale. As this eMedTV page explains, the earliest possible date that generic Atripla could become available is January 2018, when the patents for the three active ingredients in the drug expire.
  • Generic Combivir
    As explained in this eMedTV article, you can now buy Combivir (lamivudine/zidovudine) in generic form. This eMedTV page takes a closer look at this topic, with information on who makes the generic version, how it compares to brand-name Combivir, and more.
  • Generic Complera
    There are no generic Complera (emtricitabine/rilpivirine/tenofovir) products available at this time. This eMedTV page discusses when a generic version might become available and explains why it may be dangerous to buy a generic drug from another country.
  • Generic Crixivan
    At this time, there are no generic versions of Crixivan licensed for sale. This part of the eMedTV library further explains when generic Crixivan products may become available and describes the difference between a generic drug and its "generic name."
  • Generic Edurant
    There is currently no generic Edurant (rilpivirine) available. As this eMedTV article explains, the earliest date a generic version might be available is in 2019. This page also discusses the risks of buying generic Edurant from another country.
  • Generic Egrifta
    At this time, generic Egrifta (tesamorelin) is unavailable. This segment of the eMedTV library explains why, discusses when this situation could change, and describes the difference between the terms "generic version" and "generic name."
  • Generic Emtriva
    Generic Emtriva is not available at this time. This portion of the eMedTV archives explains why generic Emtriva is not currently manufactured in the United States and discusses when a generic version of the drug may become available.
  • Generic Epzicom
    Epzicom is currently not available in generic form. This page from the eMedTV library further discusses when generic Epzicom may become available and explains whether abacavir/lamivudine is a generic version of Epzicom.
  • Generic Fuzeon
    Fuzeon (enfuvirtide) is currently available in brand-name form only. This eMedTV page offers details on when a generic version may be introduced and explains the difference between a generic name and a generic version of a drug.
  • Generic Hivid
    As this portion of the eMedTV library explains, Hivid is protected by a patent that prevents any generic version of the drug from being manufactured. The earliest date that a generic Hivid could become available is July 2008, when the patent expires.
  • Generic Intelence
    Intelence (etravirine) is currently not available in generic form. As this page on the eMedTV site explains, the earliest predictable date that a generic Intelence product could become available is November 2019, when the patent for the drug expires.
  • Generic Invirase
    Patents no longer prevent any generic Invirase from being made in the United States. However, as this eMedTV page explains, no generic versions are available at this time. This article tells you what you need to know about generic Invirase.
  • Generic Isentress
    October 2022 is the earliest possible date that generic Isentress could become available. This portion of the eMedTV Web site explains that patents currently prevent a generic version from being manufactured in the United States.
  • Generic Kaletra
    December 2016 is most likely the earliest possible date that generic Kaletra could be available. This eMedTV article explains the potential dangers of buying so-called generic Kaletra products before an approved version is actually available.
  • Generic Lexiva
    Generic Lexiva products will not be available until June 2018 at the earliest. This eMedTV Web page lists possible factors that may extend the exclusivity period of Lexiva beyond 2017 and explains the risks of buying "generic" Lexiva today.
  • Generic Megace
    As explained in this eMedTV page, generic Megace (megestrol) tablets and oral suspension are available from by various companies. This page lists the available strengths of these products and discusses whether they are as good as the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Norvir
    Norvir is not available in generic form at this time. This eMedTV article further discusses when generic Norvir products may be available and explains why it may be dangerous to buy a generic form of the drug before an approved version is available.
  • Generic Prezista
    There are currently no generic Prezista products licensed for sale. This article from the eMedTV library discusses when a generic version may be available and explains the difference between a generic drug and its "generic name."
  • Generic Rescriptor
    Rescriptor (delavirdine mesylate) is not yet available in generic form. This part of the eMedTV site takes a look at why this is the case, including information on when a generic version could be introduced.
  • Generic Retrovir
    Generic Retrovir products are available in various forms, including capsules, tablets, and syrup. This eMedTV article lists the strengths available for generic Retrovir drugs and explains whether these products are equivalent to brand-name Retrovir.
  • Generic Reyataz
    Reyataz will not be available in generic form until April 2017 at the earliest. This part of the eMedTV archives discusses when a generic version may be available and explains why it may be dangerous to buy so-called "generic Reyataz" products.
  • Generic Selzentry
    Patents currently prevent any generic Selzentry from being manufactured in the United States. This eMedTV page explains that 2019 is the earliest date that a generic version may become available and explains why maraviroc is not a generic version.
  • Generic Sustiva
    There are currently no generic versions of Sustiva licensed for sale. This page from the eMedTV archives explains when generic Sustiva products may become available and discusses the possible dangers of buying so-called generic medications.
  • Generic Trizivir
    As this eMedTV page explains, no generic versions of Trizivir are available, despite the expiration of the drug's first three patents. This article takes an in-depth look at the issues surrounding generic Trizivir.
  • Generic Truvada
    Truvada is currently under the protection of patents that prevent any generic versions from being made. As this eMedTV page explains, other companies are expected to begin making generic Truvada products as soon as the patents expire in July 2017.
  • Generic Videx
    As this eMedTV segment explains, generic Videx is available in the form of delayed-release capsules and as an oral solution. This page also explains that the FDA has determined that generic Videx is equivalent to the brand-name medication.
  • Generic Viracept
    Viracept is currently not available in generic form. This part of the eMedTV library explains when generic Viracept products may become available and discusses the dangers of buying so-called "generic" versions of the drug before the patent expires.
  • Generic Viramune
    As this eMedTV page explains, Viramune (nevirapine) is now available in generic form. This article looks at the different generic versions, with details on who makes them and how they compare to the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Viramune XR
    You can now buy one strength of Viramune XR (nevirapine XR) as a generic. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at generic Viramune XR, with info on who makes it, how it compares to the brand-name product, and more.
  • Generic Viread
    There are currently no generic Viread products available on the market. This eMedTV segment looks at why no generic versions of the drug are being sold and provides information on when a generic form could become available.
  • Generic Zerit
    Zerit is currently available in generic form. This selection from the eMedTV archives takes a closer look at generic Zerit, including information on who makes it and how it compares to the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Ziagen
    At this time, Ziagen tablets (but not Ziagen oral solution) are available in the United States. This eMedTV page takes a closer look at this topic, with information on who makes the generic version and how it compares to the brand-name drug.
  • Hepatitis C and HIV
    Hepatitis C and HIV can both be transmitted through contaminated needles or unprotected sex. As this eMedTV Web page explains, a co-infection with hepatitis C and HIV can be quite serious and can affect the treatment for either of the conditions.
  • HIV
    HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) gradually makes the body unable to fight certain cancers and infections. This eMedTV Web page discusses the diagnosis, prevention, transmission, and symptoms of HIV and AIDS.
  • HIV and Depression
    Treatment options for HIV and depression include medications, therapy, and herbal remedies. This page of the eMedTV library discusses HIV and depression, and explains the importance of recognizing and treating it in people with serious illnesses.
  • HIV Info
    If you are looking for info on HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), this eMedTV article is a good place to start. It gives a description of HIV and its symptoms, transmission, and treatment. Also included is a link to more information.
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